Safety defects found on Telford Bridge

Safety defects found on Telford Bridge

It’s not just the Iron Bridge that is being restored as the Jackfield and Coalport Memorial Bridge is also being preserved for the future in the Ironbridge Gorge.

Telford & Wrekin Council recently carried out a principal inspection on the structure a couple of weeks ago and identified several safety defects. An immediate make safe job was carried out from the deck at the end of June and contractors have recently been on the river on a pontoon making repairs from below. This involves new lateral support to failing structural beams. Added to this some of the most damaged deck planks have been replaced with a temporary material. This is an intermediate make safe solution so that the bridge does not need to be closed.

This will provide the Council with the time needed to carry out the necessary design work and to source funding as the project will require a significant investment.

The Coalport and Jackfield Memorial Bridge, spanning The River Severn was erected in 1922 as a memorial to those who had died in WWI.

Cllr Nicola Lowery, Ward Member for the Ironbridge Gorge said: “The Jackfield and Coalport Memorial Bridge symbolises an important part of our history as it commemorates twenty-six men from Coalport and Jackfield. The Bridge was previously restored and reinstated in 2000 and whilst it is structurally sound, it’s likely that the Council will need to replace all of the timber on the bridge which will form part of the design.

“The Memorial bridge also provides a vital link between our communities in Jackfield and Coalport, which is both used by many local residents and visitors. It is therefore excellent news to see that plans are being drawn up to ensure we continue to invest in preserving our structures and this piece of history in Jackfield and Coalport”.

8 thoughts on “Safety defects found on Telford Bridge

  • July 19, 2018 at 8:06 pm
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    One of the main issues I’ve found is that of disrespectful cyclists who fail to dismount before crossing despite the clear signs. It’s a memorial bridge and as such should be treated better than being ridden up and down. The cyclists I do see dismount, I always wave and say thank you to.

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    • July 19, 2018 at 10:28 pm
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      The ‘heavy’ footfall on the bridge will cause more damaged than a smooth gliding cyclist. I understand your point from a principle perspective, but not from a damage limitation one.

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  • July 19, 2018 at 8:23 pm
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    It certainly needs work doing to it and would be a travesty if it were to be replaced by a more modern type. It’s important to note that this is a very unique war memorial in that it’s one of the few in the world that has a public function, I.e it can be used. It’s a very important part of our local and national heritage for that reason alone.

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  • July 19, 2018 at 9:00 pm
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    It would help, as far as the decking is concerned, if mountain bikers would stop riding bikes up the steps, across the bridge and down the steps the other side, seen it to often, had “discussions” with more than one who had ridden across the bridge.

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  • July 19, 2018 at 9:03 pm
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    Lee Pearson remember when we used to go over this bridge when we were little and it was bouncy

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